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Introducing Marketing

textbook cover image
Cover image "Reflections on Market Street" (https://flic.kr/p/4tHYm) by Thomas Hawk (https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/) is used under a CC BY-NC license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/)

Description: Through good economic times and bad, marketing remains the pivotal function in any business. Determining and satisfying the needs of customers through products that have value and accessibility and whose features are clearly communicated is the general purpose of any business. It is also a fundamental definition of marketing. This text introduces students to the marketing strategies and tools that practitioners use to market their products.

Author: John Burnett

Original source: www.dropbox.com

Adoption (faculty): Contact us if you are using this textbook in your course

Adaptations: Support for adapting an open textbook

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Attribution 3.0 License. Copyright Yusuke Kamiyamane. Print PDF (.pdf) (12 MB)
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Attribution 3.0 License. Copyright Yusuke Kamiyamane. EDITABLE: Open Document Text file (.odt) (49 MB)

Review this book

Reviews for 'Introducing Marketing'

Number of reviews: 3
Average Rating: 3.23 out of 5

1. Reviewed by: Janice Edwards
  • Institution: College of the Rockies
  • Title/Position: Instructor
  • Overall Rating: 2.2 out of 5
  • Date:
  • License: Creative Commons License

Q: The text covers all areas and ideas of the subject appropriately and provides an effective index and/or glossary

All marketing concepts are covered and explained in conversational tone.

Table of Contents at beginning of book; glossary at end of each chapter.

Content is U.S.A.-oriented, so Canadian students may not be able to relate as well. About 5% of content is non-U.S.A. examples

Content cover small to large corporations. Very few examples of not-for-profits.

Text does not discuss nor describe the 4 Ps of Marketing as such, which has been a standard for teaching Marketing for many years.

Comprehensiveness Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: Content is accurate, error-free and unbiased

The text identifies copyright date of 2011. However, no content has been updated since 2000.

Therefore the book has no mention of Facebook, Twitter, or social media in general.

Two proofreaders were credited in the frontispiece, but there are several spelling errors throughout the book.

Some unfortunate word/phrase choices: e.g. "the elderly market (age 65 and over)".

Discussion of Family Life Cycle is the outdated, traditional model; does not include blended families, adult singles, etc.

Many brands and companies mentioned no longer exist: e.g. Nissan Prairie Joy.

Content Accuracy Rating: 2 out of 5

Q: Content is up-to-date, but not in a way that will quickly make the text obsolete within a short period of time. The text is written and/or arranged in such a way that necessary updates will be relatively easy and straightforward to implement

Content is not up to date. Text is obsolete. Copyright date in Open Text is 2011, but no information has been updated since 2000. Reference sources are necessarily even more outdated.

The text has no inclusion of Facebook, Twitter or social media in general. Therefore, there is no discussion of how to incorporate social media into marketing mix. Communication process is described as a 2-way process, not interactive.

Text includes several examples of websites, brands and companies which no longer exist.

Photo graphics are primarily black-and-white, poor quality screen grabs from ca. 2000. Charts are very basic grids which are unappealing to the eye.

Text refers to companion website 'Interactive Journal' which appears to be no longer available. Several links to websites appear to be no longer available.

Very difficult to update the text without a complete re-write.

Relevance Rating: 1 out of 5

Q: The text is written in lucid, accessible prose, and provides adequate context for any jargon/technical terminology used

Text is written in conversational style, and adequately discusses jargon and technical terminology. Glossary included at end of each chapter.

Marketing Mix of 4Ps not included in book.

Many sentences in each chapter are very long; at least 30 words per sentence, some sentences exceeding 40 words.

Information seems to be massed together, rather than set out through headings and sub-headings, making visual identification of key points more difficult.

A great deal of prose; very few illustrations or photos. Illustrations and photos only black/white, often with outdated content.

Book does not have adequate current information.

Clarity Rating: 2 out of 5

Q: The text is internally consistent in terms of terminology and framework

The book consists of 10 chapters:
1. Introducing marketing
2. Understanding and approaching the market
3. Marketing research: an aid to decision making
4. Understanding buyer behavior
5. External considerations in marketing
6. Marketing in global markets
7. Introducing and managing the product
8. Communicating to mass markets
9. Pricing the product
10. Channel concepts: distributing the product

Most chapters are under 30 pages; Chapter 8 has 42 pages.

Last four chapters cover the 4 Ps (although not identified as '4 Ps': Product, Promotion, Price and Place. The 4Ps concept is often presented earlier in the book in comparable marketing texts.

Consistency Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: The text is easily and readily divisible into smaller reading sections that can be assigned at different points within the course (i.e., enormous blocks of text without subheadings should be avoided). The text should not be overly self-referential, and should be easily reorganized and realigned with various subunits of a course without presenting much disruption to the reader.

Not easily divisible. Each chapter is composed of large blocks of text without sufficient headings and subheadings to identify sections.

Review questions at end of each chapter are indicated by '>', not numbers. Therefore, it would be difficult to discuss, assign or differentiate questions.

Modularity Rating: 2 out of 5

Q: The topics in the text are presented in a logical, clear fashion

The topics are presented in a logical fashion, and chapters could be switched around to suit the user.

Many chapters provide information overload due use of long sentences and long paragraphs. Many examples in each chapter of sentences with 30+ words per sentence. Chapters could use more headings and subheadings to break up blocks of prose.

The 4 Ps (product, place, promotion and product) are not presented as a concept. Those four topics are presented at the end of the text, rather than earlier in the book. The 4 Ps is a cornerstone of most modern marketing textbooks.

Organization Rating: 2 out of 5

Q: The text is free of significant interface issues, including navigation problems, distortion of images/charts, and any other display features that may distract or confuse the reader

The text apparently had (at one time) a companion website and/or online journal, "your Interactive Journal".

Many live links to websites do not work, or the website or web page is no longer available.

Charts are basic square boxes, not adjusted for size of lettering or content of each box. Information becomes lost by presentation of type in large boxes with too much white space.

Black-and-white screen grab illustrations are poor quality, and therefore easily overlooked.

Interface Rating: 2 out of 5

Q: The text contains no grammatical errors

Each chapter in the text has many sentences with over 30 words; sometimes 40+ words.

Paragraphs are often overly long.

Text would be improved with more headings and sub-headings within the chapters.

A few spelling errors in each chapter.

Grammar Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: The text is not culturally insensitive or offensive in any way. It should make use of examples that are inclusive of a variety of races, ethnicities, and backgrounds

Very few references to culture, including race, ethnicity or background.

Text would probably be viewed as exclusionary rather than inclusive.

Cultural Relevance Rating: 2 out of 5

Q: Are there any other comments you would like to make about this book, for example, its appropriateness in a Canadian context or specific updates you think need to be made?

Content severely outdated, with no updates since 2000. Needs complete overhaul.

Negligible reference to Canada or Canadian business.

Outdated references to available technology. No inclusion of interactivity, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram. No inclusion of social media strategies in Marketing.

2. Reviewed by: Dr. Paul Clark
  • Institution: Thompson Rivers University
  • Title/Position: Faculty, School of Business and Economics
  • Overall Rating: 3.8 out of 5
  • Date:
  • License: Creative Commons License

Q: The text covers all areas and ideas of the subject appropriately and provides an effective index and/or glossary

I do not feel this text covers two core topics in marketing adequately, such as:
positioning and branding.

There is a good index (Table of Contents)at the beginning of the book, and the individual Chapters do have a "Key Terms" Glossary. There is no glossary at the end of the text book, however.

Comprehensiveness Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: Content is accurate, error-free and unbiased

The content is not always accurate - most notably where there are links to external resources.

For example, on page 30 the text has a hyperlink to the Wall Street Journal. Before and after this link the text makes reference to specific characteristics of the wsj.com www site, such as there being 5 major areas of the newspaper. However, the wsj.com www site now has 12 different sections of its paper.

I also feel the content is heavily biased towards a US student. There are minimal, if any, references to non-US based organizations or market characteristics.

Content Accuracy Rating: 1 out of 5

Q: Content is up-to-date, but not in a way that will quickly make the text obsolete within a short period of time. The text is written and/or arranged in such a way that necessary updates will be relatively easy and straightforward to implement

The age of the text is one of its most noticeable deficiencies.

For example, the first references in the text allude to the anniversary of Elvis Presley's death "20 years ago." This is a very noticeable distraction from the text content.

Additionally, the age of the text is almost a significant deficiency when discussing market research methodology's. This text would not provide students with an up-to-date understanding of how much market research is done - with the aid of information technology. Internet searches, are, for example, an inexpensive and efficient way to gain a basic understanding of potential competitors in any given geography.

This is also evident in Chapter 5, "External Considerations in Marketing" where references to both less well-known companies and brands and outdated technology are made. These characteristics would, I believe, distract from the readers ability to clearly understand the text content. More recent and well-known examples would, on the other hand, be much more effective and easier for readers to comprehend.

Relevance Rating: 2 out of 5

Q: The text is written in lucid, accessible prose, and provides adequate context for any jargon/technical terminology used

Yes, the language is good. The style of writing, and diction, are easy to understand and follow.

Clarity Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: The text is internally consistent in terms of terminology and framework

Yes, the text is characterized by the same framework for each chapter. The chapters each contact a blend of:
cases
glossary
content introduction

Consistency Rating: 5 out of 5

Q: The text is easily and readily divisible into smaller reading sections that can be assigned at different points within the course (i.e., enormous blocks of text without subheadings should be avoided). The text should not be overly self-referential, and should be easily reorganized and realigned with various subunits of a course without presenting much disruption to the reader.

Yes, the text does lend itself to being worked through by students in a series of sequential and logical steps. In particular, the text does work through the marketing process albeit with this authors own "twist".

As alluded to earlier, however, I do not believe he addresses all of the topics effectively. For example, branding and positioning and not sufficiently discussed.

Modularity Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: The topics in the text are presented in a logical, clear fashion

Yes, the topics are presented in a logical and clear fashion.

In particular, from the Table of Contents and throughout the book the reader is easily able to follow the development of marketing concepts. The use of "Learning Objectives" at the beginning of the individual Chapters also contributes to this.

Organization Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: The text is free of significant interface issues, including navigation problems, distortion of images/charts, and any other display features that may distract or confuse the reader

There are some interface errors. For example, on page 44, the image is overlapping the text. The image is not sized correctly.

Interface Rating: 5 out of 5

Q: The text contains no grammatical errors

There were no grammatical errors evident in the text.

Grammar Rating: 5 out of 5

Q: The text is not culturally insensitive or offensive in any way. It should make use of examples that are inclusive of a variety of races, ethnicities, and backgrounds

Yes, the text is not insensitive or offensive to different cultures. In my review yesterday and today of the text I saw no references that could be negatively interpreted.

Cultural Relevance Rating: 5 out of 5

Q: Are there any other comments you would like to make about this book, for example, its appropriateness in a Canadian context or specific updates you think need to be made?

Yes, I have a number of summary observations.

Firstly, as alluded to earlier, this book has minimal - if any - Canadian content. I feel this text is therefore not suitable for Canadian contexts.

Secondly, this book suffers from being old - the examples it uses in the final chapters when discussing the marketing mix, for example are noticeably outdated. In particular the texts coverage of concepts surrounding the development of new products, marketing communications, distribution, and pricing, are based on market conditions from 1999-2000. Most noticeably, this text lacks sufficient reference to the way the internet has changed consumer behavior (the www is a common way consumer learn about product choices and pricing for example), market behavior (the way brands and organizations respond to changes in the market), and organizational behavior (how brands advertise, price, and distribute their products /services are all highly influenced by the www).

Thirdly, text is deficient in any discussion of sustainability, and corporate social responsibility. Macro international trends, in these areas are not discussed (due to the texts age. As such, the text does not offer an up-to-date analysis of how consumer behavior has changed, and similarly how corporate behavior is also changing.

3. Reviewed by: CHEN YU JAMES LIU
  • Institution: Assiniboine Community College
  • Title/Position: Marketing Instructor
  • Overall Rating: 3.7 out of 5
  • Date:
  • License: Creative Commons License

Q: The text covers all areas and ideas of the subject appropriately and provides an effective index and/or glossary

This textbook covers all areas of the basic marketing concepts and it does not include index or appendix section.

Comprehensiveness Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: Content is accurate, error-free and unbiased

This textbook has 10 chapters which does cover the essential marketing knowledge and skills. It did cover the global marketing issue and students will get advantages when they start working in the industry.

Content Accuracy Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: Content is up-to-date, but not in a way that will quickly make the text obsolete within a short period of time. The text is written and/or arranged in such a way that necessary updates will be relatively easy and straightforward to implement

Although there are 10 chapters in this textbook, it should be easy for college instructor to fit into college student's time table. However, there should be a video to support case study or case application in this textbook.

Relevance Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: The text is written in lucid, accessible prose, and provides adequate context for any jargon/technical terminology used

After reviewed this textbook, I found that the author has a lot of experience in teaching or working in marketing filed. However, there seems too much information and detail in each chapter which may make the college students felt overwhelmed when learning the basic marketing ideas. When compared to other marketing textbooks, the writing style of this text is not easy to follow for college students and there should be more reminders for explanation of key marketing terms.

Clarity Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: The text is internally consistent in terms of terminology and framework

I did find the author did connect the overall marketing concepts quite well.

Consistency Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: The text is easily and readily divisible into smaller reading sections that can be assigned at different points within the course (i.e., enormous blocks of text without subheadings should be avoided). The text should not be overly self-referential, and should be easily reorganized and realigned with various subunits of a course without presenting much disruption to the reader.

This might be a bit problem of this textbook. Although the text can be separated in different sections, the connection between main heading and subheading has been not that clear divided. For example, the author mentioned that the consumers can be segmented by different factors in the following discussion on page 42. If the author can briefly mention what are the main factors to segment the consumers at the beginning, I think students can have this bigger picture in their minds when learning about how to targeting on specific customers.

Modularity Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: The topics in the text are presented in a logical, clear fashion

The topics in the text are clearly structured but the 'case study' in each chapter should be marked in order for reading purpose.

Organization Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: The text is free of significant interface issues, including navigation problems, distortion of images/charts, and any other display features that may distract or confuse the reader

There are some charts or tables may confuse to the readers because they can not be understood easily by just reading it. When the readers use these charts and tables, they should understand the meaning of these charts immediately even without the explanations. For example, the Exhibition 3 in Chapter 2 (p#42) is confusing to the reader especially it is placed next to the Capsule 4 table. Also, the table is needed in Chapter 6 when discussing the factors that influence on the international marketing environment in order to help the readers what are the main or minor factors when entering into the foreign market.

Interface Rating: 3 out of 5

Q: The text contains no grammatical errors

I do not find any grammatical problems when reviewing this text.

Grammar Rating: 5 out of 5

Q: The text is not culturally insensitive or offensive in any way. It should make use of examples that are inclusive of a variety of races, ethnicities, and backgrounds

I did not find any offensive issue in the cultural part when I was reading it. On the other hand, I would like to encourage the author to provide more examples in cultural differences when implement the marketing strategies in the foreign market when discussing the global marketing environment in Chapter 6 or marketing mix chapters.

Cultural Relevance Rating: 4 out of 5

Q: Are there any other comments you would like to make about this book, for example, its appropriateness in a Canadian context or specific updates you think need to be made?

I think the text should focus more on the Canadian students’ needs, for example, the case study could use Canadian products or companies to illustrate the marketing topics. I like the authors did consider the importance of global marketing in Canadian market, however, the author did not stress strong enough the importance of marketing in Canadian market. I would recommend the author to use QR codes because it increasingly being used as part of marketing strategy, and have begun to appear in textbooks to link students to ads, videos, and other resources.